Harteman Wildfowl, presented by Jan Harteman

Limpkin

Aramus guarauna

Koerlan

The Limpkin is a bird that looks like a large rail but is skeletally closer to cranes. It is the only extant species in the genus Aramus and the family Aramidae. It is found mostly in wetlands in warm parts of the Americas, from Florida to northern Argentina. It feeds on molluscs, with the diet dominated by apple snails of the genus Pomacea. Its name derives from its seeming limp when it walks.

 

This species has an extremely large range in Latin- and Central America, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size is extremely large, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). The total population is estimated to number 1,000,000 individuals. For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern by the IUCN.

 

No birds present in avicultural collections or zoos in Europe.


Aramus guarauna Limpkin in the Pantanal, Brazil

 

Aramus guarauna Limpkin in the Pantanal, Brazil

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