Harteman Wildfowl, presented by Jan Harteman

Chestnut teal

Anas castanea

Kastanjetaling / Kastanienente / Sarcelle châtaine

 

The Chestnut teal is found in south-western and south-eastern Australia. In the east, it is found from Rockhampton, Queensland to Ceduna, South Australia, being most common in New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania. It is also a vagrant to New Guinea and Lord Howe Island.

 

This species has a very large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size is very large, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern (IUCN, 2012).

 

The Chestnut Teal is found on wetlands and estuaries in coastal regions, and is one of the few ducks able to tolerate high salinity waters, although it still needs fresh water for drinking. It will also use open freshwater lakes, reservoirs and sewage ponds during dry seasons. It mainly breeds in coastal areas, needing hollow trees in water or short grasslands near water for nesting, and it will readily take to suitable nest boxes.

 

Read more about captive breeding Chestnut teal, by the late Ron Brumby (Australian aviculturist).

 

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Above: adult male Chestnut teal

 

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Above: adult male Chestnut teal

 

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Above: adult female Chestnut teal

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